Intensive Probation

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In 1985, Intensive Probation Supervision (IPS) was created as a prison diversion program. IPS is a highly structured program with very strict guidelines. It emphasizes the repayment of restitution, behavioral change, employment, house arrest, treatment and community service.

Participants are diverted from prison by the use of this alternative method of supervision. They are afforded the opportunity to remain with their family or loved ones, while attempting to make amends for the injustice they have inflicted on others. Only those probation-eligible offenders who have been convicted of a felony or an undesignated felony are eligible for intensive probation.  The goal of these teams is to ensure that probationers comply, embrace life-changing skills and graduate to standard probation. The intensive caseloads are smaller than those of standard probation, because a higher level of supervision is required.

The program consists of four levels, each lasting approximately twelve weeks. There is a level five, which is reserved for probationers participating in long-term residential treatment. Those who comply fully with the terms of their probation may expect to be in the program for one year or less, depending on their individual needs. Those who aren’t successful could remain for a longer period of time at each level or, if continued noncompliant behavior is exhibited, may be returned to court to face revocation proceedings. Intensive probation supervision has set standards for minimum weekly visual contacts for each probationer, depending on the level of supervision. 

In September 2008, the Yuma County Adult Probation Department re-organized the Intensive Probation program to reflect an Evidence Based approach to high risk offender supervision and implement a "best practices" supervision model that reflects what corrections models have been proven to protect the community and increase positive behavioral changes in probationers.

10 year Performance Measures


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